Retrospective Pigalinaing

I haven’t updated this for about a month, and it is not for lack of anything to mention. On the contrary, since the last update the Pigalinas have been to Australia, explored new places at home and spent as many nights away from each other in two weeks as the first ten years together.
I will endeavour to do some retrospective updates, while keeping up to date at the same time. Very slack of me.

Happy? Valentines Day

Pigalinas know how to make Valentines Day lovey-dovey. Last year we watched the romantic comedy “12 Years a Slave”, this year we watched the up-lifting “The Skeleton Twins”.
“Hilarious” the poster said, “Really funny”. Don’t believe it.

Seal Spotting at Taiaroa Head

We headed out to the end of the Otago Peninsula to investigate what is there, as it has been many years since we did.
Pilots Beach held a wealth of seals and they were not scared of humans – sunbathing on the rocks within feet of the many people. Living at the site of one of Dunedin’s most popular tourist attractions (the albatross colony) will do that to you.
The other side revealed steep cliffs with a view of the lighthouse and numerous nesting birds. We didn’t spot any albatross but I can confirm you can see some good sights at the end of the peninsula without spending any money.

Waitangi Day at Nitro Circus

Waitangi Day and the country was on holiday. In Dunedin it rained constantly so it is a good job we have a covered stadium (take that stadium haters…). Nitro Circus came to town and they were spectacular. I didn’t get any photos of the action as I didn’t want to miss any of the action and there were plenty of other people taking shaky videos and grainy snaps.
We saw a backflip on a motorbike with four people riding it, a front flip, wheelchair backflips, triple backflips on BMX and so much more.
Mr Pigalina had pondered if two hours of flips and tricks would get a bit boring, it certainly didn’t!

(The only bit I would change was the irritating family in front – kids throwing food, oblivious dads and one drunken mother who spent the whole show taking selfies and texting.)

Seagull Discrimination

It turns out it matters what colour you are if you are a seagull in New Zealand, and I’m talking beak colour.

There are three types of seagull in New Zealand – as far as I have determined – yellow beak big ones, red beak and black beak.  I am not sure which colour makes you the most important but *spolier* it’s not red.

Today on my way to work a seagull was sitting on the grass next to the footpath.  It didn’t make any attempt to move when people walked past so I knew something wasn’t right.  I went to touch the bird and it did move, and then I noticed that both of its legs were out behind it and it was “sitting” on its belly.  There was no way it could fly away as it could not push off the ground with its legs.

I called the Department of Conservation (DOC) hotline for injured wildlife.

“Do you help seagulls?”

“What kind is it?” they asked

“One of the ones with the red beak and red legs.”

“No, try the SPCA”.

I then had to find the number and call the SPCA “No we don’t, try DOC.”

“I just called them, they said to call you.”

“Tell them that you are in Dunedin, the Dunedin branch helps those kind.”

I called DOC back again and the lady didn’t sound very interested, I explained how the SPCA had said that the Dunedin branch helps them so therefore I had called back.  She asked if I could take the bird to the office – no, not without wrangling into my cardigan and carrying across busy roads and a few blocks.  She logged a job with them and said that they would call me back and instructed me to call the Dunedin office myself also.  I did.  They were shut.

Just as I was hanging up a young man appeared.  He asked if the bird was hurt and, as if to demonstrate that yes it was, it scooched awkwardly across onto the footpath.  I told him the saga and he said that his mum had helped lots of injured seagulls out so he would take it home.  He threw his jumper over the bird and said he would head home to feed it up on cat food.  After declining a ride he was gone, bird in arms.

DOC did not call me back until almost 40 minutes later when I was at my desk.  I would have been late for work, and would have stood on the side of the road for close to an hour.  When I told them that the bird had been taken by the kind boy the woman said “It probably won’t heal.”  “He will make it comfortable anyway.” I replied.  I know your game DOC, you would take my injured bird and kill it without letting it rest on a nice bed scoffing cat food before it goes!  At least it got taken in by a family that cares, even if its days are numbered, not left on the side of the road for hours by the organisations supposed to help creatures.

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